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Liberty &
Founding Father Quotes


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Liberty, Revolutionary & Founding Father Quotes

 
Benjamin Franklin
Inventor - Statesman - Rebel - Founding Father • USA • 1706 - 1790

Benjamin Franklin (January 17, 1706 - April 17, 1790) was one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. A noted polymath, Franklin was a leading author, printer, political theorist, politician, postmaster, scientist, musician, inventor, satirist, civic activist, statesman, and diplomat. As a scientist, he was a major figure in the American Enlightenment and the history of physics for his discoveries and theories regarding electricity. Additonal Reading
 

Liberty Quotes by: Benjamin Franklin




What do these Benjamin Franklin quotes mean to you? Comment below...

• They who can give up essential liberty to obtain a little temporary safety deserve neither liberty nor safety. • comment


• Any society that would give up a little liberty to gain a little security will deserve neither and lose both. • comment


• But, ah, think what you do when you run in debt: you give another power over your liberty. • comment


• Democracy is two wolves and a lamb voting on what to have for lunch. Liberty is a well-armed lamb contesting the vote. • comment


• In free governments, the rulers are the servants, and the people their superiors and sovereigns. • comment


• The Constitution only gives people the right to pursue happiness. You have to catch it yourself. • comment


• When the people find that they can vote themselves money, that will herald the end of the republic. Sell not liberty to purchase power. • comment


• Freedom is not a gift bestowed upon us by other men, but a right that belongs to us by the laws of God and nature. • comment


• I think the best way of doing good to the poor, is not making them easy in poverty, but leading or driving them out of it. • comment


• Only a virtuous people are capable of freedom. As nations become corrupt and vicious, they have more need of masters. • comment


• In those wretched countries where a man cannot call his tongue his own, he can scarce call anything his own. Whoever would overthrow the liberty of a nation must begin by subduing the freeness of speech. • comment


• Without freedom of thought there can be no such thing as wisdom; and no such thing as public liberty without freedom of speech. • comment


• Printers are educated in the Belief, that when Men differ in Opinion, both sides ought equally to have the Advantage of being heard by the Public; and that when Truth and Error have fair Play, the former is always an overmatch for the latter: Hence [printers] cheerfully serve all contending Writers that pay them well, without regarding on which side they are of the Question in Dispute. • comment


• The sun of liberty is set; you must light up the candle of industry and economy. • comment


• We must all hang together, or assuredly we shall all hang separately. • comment


• Sell not virtue to purchase wealth, nor Liberty to purchase power. • comment


• Make yourselves sheep and the wolves will eat you. • comment


• There was never a good war, or a bad peace. • comment


• It is the first responsibility of every citizen to question authority. • comment


• A Bible and a newspaper in every house, a good school in every district - all studied and appreciated as they merit - are the principal support of virtue, morality, and civil liberty. • comment


• A nation of well informed men who have been taught to know and prize the rights which God has given them cannot be enslaved. It is in the region of ignorance that tyranny begins. • comment


• No man's life, liberty or fortune is safe while our legislature is in session. • comment


• Our Constitution is in actual operation; everything appears to promise that it will last; but in this world nothing is certain but death and taxes. • comment


• That is simple. In the Colonies we issue our own money. It is called Colonial Scrip. We issue it in proper proportion to the demands of trade and industry to make the products pass easily from the producers to the consumers. In this manner, creating for ourselves our own paper money, we control its purchasing power, and we have no interest to pay no one. • comment


• If by the liberty of the press were understood merely the liberty of discussing the propriety of public measures and political opinions, let us have as much of it as you please: But if it means the liberty of affronting, calumniating and defaming one another, I, for my part, own myself willing to part with my share of it, whenever our legislators shall please so to alter the law and shall chearfully consent to exchange my liberty of abusing others for the privilege of not being abused myself. • comment


• We are all born ignorant, but one must work hard to remain stupid. • comment


• I agree to this Constitution with all its faults, if they are such: because I think a General Government necessary for us, and there is no Form of Government but what may be a Blessing to the People if well-administred; and I believe farther that this is likely to be well administred for a Course of Years and can only end in Despotism as other Forms have done before it, when the People shall become so corrupted as to need Despotic Government, being incapable of any other. • comment


• When there's no Law, there's no Bread. • comment


• No nation was ever ruined by trade, even seemingly the most disadvantageous. • comment


• Slavery is such an atrocious debasement of human nature, that its very extirpation, if not performed with solicitous care, may sometimes open a source of serious evils. • comment


• The ordaining of laws in favor of one part of the nation, to the prejudice and oppression of another, is certainly the most erroneous and mistaken policy. An equal dispensation of protection, rights, privileges, and advantages, is what every part is entitled to, and ought to enjoy. • comment


• It is a common observation here that our cause is the cause of all mankind, and that we are fighting for their liberty in defending our own. • comment


 

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What's the meaning of these Benjamin Franklin quotes to you?